Not Just Physical Violence

Someone doesn’t have to hit you, choke you or slam your head into a wall in order for it to be violence. They can degrade you, humiliate you, blame you, scream at you, lie to you, cheat-on or betray you. Withhold or control your finances, or even just try to control your movements and who you see and socialise with.

For me, this could be describing many of “our” doolyas [police], politician, bureaucrats, current health services, and many other “people” who are in positions of self-importance, power and legally protected “privilege” or profession.

Being “violated” is often described as a feeling of disempowerment — feeling powerless or worthless — a form of “violence” against a person’s spiritual, energetic, and/or mental self-worth & psyche-o-logical safety and well-being.

These are some of the methods and ways known or experienced as domestic, family or relational violence.

In the English language, especially in psychology and sociological usage, more so these days such “people” who commit and/or display such acts of violence, abuse (of power/position) upon another’s “personal sovereignty” are known as narcissists, sociopaths, or psychopaths. They are always perpetrators (predators) amongst the living, needing to feed off another, needing to fulfil themselves by means of of the life-force and/or lives of their victims.

Author: David John

David has worked in community & human services for >40 years, the last decade has been employed as a Counsellor, specialising in relationships & men’s issues. He has an extensive range of skills and experience in youth work, Aboriginal community and political work, as well as in presentation, adult education, and experiential learning..

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